Wildlife Rehabilitators’ Association of Massachusetts

Wildlife Rehabilitators’ Association of Massachusetts (WRAM) is a non-profit organization that has been committed to the professionalism of Wildlife Rehabilitation in Massachusetts since 1992.

Owlet

Find a Wildlife Rehabilitator

If you find a sick or injured animal, it is important to locate a licensed rehabilitator. Many rehabilitators specialize in caring for certain types of wildlife such as songbirds or small mammals, however the permit allows them to accept all authorized wildlife.

Find a wildlife rehabilitator…

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Found injured or orphaned wildlife?

if you have found an orphaned or injured animal, the best place to start is to call your local animal control or find a local wildlife rehabilitator, which may be able to assist with transport or refer you to a local wildlife rehabilitation facility.

Learn more about what to do…

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Resources

We have compiled a list of resources for people who have found injured or orphaned wildlife and want to find out who to call to people interested in becoming a wildlife rehabilitator in Massachusetts.

Learn more..

News, Announcements & Events

Recent Facebook Posts

Wildlife Rehabilitators’ Association of Massachusetts – WRAM shared Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University‘s album.

Some great work being done by our friends at Tufts Wildlife Clinic.

A juvenile bald eagle recovers from a fractured bone in its right leg at Tufts Wildlife Clinic. This young eagle came to Cummings School after falling out of the nest. The fracture was surgically repaired and has now healed. The eagle was hand fed over several weeks but is now self-feeding. The bird was moved into our Shalin Liu Healing Cage last week and is finally learning how to spread its wings and fly! Photos by Alonso Nichols/Tufts University.

Some great work being done by our friends at Tufts Wildlife Clinic.

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Wildlife Rehabilitators’ Association of Massachusetts – WRAM shared Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, Inc.’s photo.

Helpful information to help prevent window strikes by birds from our friends at Tri-State Bird Rescue.

Most of our patients are brought to us for care after they’ve been affected by human activity, and over the next few weeks, we’ll be discussing some of the common causes of injury we treat and how you can help prevent them!
One of the most common causes of injury we see is window strikes. While this most often affects songbirds, hawks can also fall victim to this hazard when chasing prey. Window strike patients often have neurological symptoms, eye injuries, broken bones, a ruptured crop, or other internal injuries. Many window strikes occur in residential areas and are preventable! Birds are not able to tell the difference between a reflection and the actual landscape, and some window configurations create the appearance of a safe passage through a building. Both of these situations contribute to bird collisions with glass, but fortunately, you can make windows safer and help save birds’ lives. Visit tristatebird.org/injury-prevention/ for more information.

Helpful information to help prevent window strikes by birds from our friends at Tri-State Bird Rescue.

Wildlife Rehabilitators’ Association of Massachusetts – WRAM shared Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, Inc.’s photo.

Please help all wildlife by picking up and properly disposing of all improperly discarded fishing gear, weights, and fishing lines. You will help prevent many injuries and entanglements to wildlife if you do. You may even save a life!

Did you know that the majority of our patients are injured directly or indirectly by human activity? Thankfully, this means many of these injuries can be prevented, and you can help! Improperly discarded fishing line and gear can cause serious and sometimes fatal injuries to birds and other wildlife. Fishing line can wrap around legs, wings, and beaks, cutting off circulation or causing starvation. It can even end up in nests and injure baby birds. Please properly discard weights, sinkers, and fishing line or pick them up where you see them. It might just save a life!

Please help all wildlife by picking up and properly disposing of all improperly discarded fishing gear, weights, and fishing lines. You will help prevent many injuries and entanglements to wildlife if you do. You may even save a life!